Man-Booker-prize-winner.jpg
Man-Booker-prize-winner.jpg
(Image credit: Rex Features (Shutterstock))

See who won this years Man Booker Prize and find out about which novels made the shortlist for the 2015 Man Booker Prize Award.

And the winner goes to... Marlon James for his novel A Brief History Of Seven Killings.

The 44-year-old author was announced the winner last night in London and was presented his prize by the Duchess of Cornwall. This is the first time a Jamaican author has won the Man Booker Prize. Marlon said it was "so surreal" to win while dedicating his award to his late father who had shaped his "literary sensibilities". Living now in America James revealed his first novel John Crow’s Devil was rejected over 70 times saying he was ready to give up before it was published in 2005.

Chair of the judges, Michael Wood, described the novel as the "most exciting" book on the shortlist. With it being "full of surprises", "very violent" and "full of swearing", the 680-page novel was inspired by reggage music according to the author. It only took 2 hours until the judges came to a unanimous decision.

Being set across three decades, the novel uses the true story of the attempt on the life of reggae star Bob Marley to explore the turbulent world of Jamaican gangs and politics. Jamaica, December 1976, just weeks before the general election. Marley is gearing himself up to ease political tension with a free concert. Days before, seven men storm his house with machine guns. He survives and plays, but leaves the country the next day and doesn't return for 2 years. This imagined oral biography is based on 'interviews' from everyone involved in one of the most talked about events in Jamaican history.

Wood added "One of the pleasures of reading it is that you turn the page and you're not quite sure who the next narrator will be... Someone said to me they like to give Booker winners to their mother to read, but this might be a little difficult."

Buy A Brief History Of Seven Killings By Marlon James

Man Booker Prize Runner's Up

Man Booker Prize Runner's Up

The Man Booker Prize lived up to its controversial reputation yet again with these novels that made the shortlist but sadly lost out to James. The shortlist featured a diverse group of authors and stories. Chigozie Obioma (Nigeria) who at 28 was the youngest nominee to be shortlisted for his debut novel, The Fisherman is in the running. Obioma was joined by two Britons, two Americans, and a novelist from Jamaica, who is the first Jamaican-born author to be included. Many household names including William Boyd and Margaret Atwood missed out on a nod from the panel, who choose from a list of 156 books. The judges will announced the winner on Tuesday and Marlon James will receive a cheque for £50,000. With each of the shortlisted authors receiving £2,500 and a specially bound edition of their book. Last year, The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanangan - a novel about one man's experiences building the Burma Death Railway - was crowned the winner. While you may not have the time to read all 6 books, you can catch up on the basics. Make sure you're clued up for your next book club meeting with the Man Booker Prize shortlist round up...

A Spool Of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

A Spool Of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

A Baltimore house is the anchor for four generations of the Whitshank family. This is the tale of those four walls and the moments they have seen. Unsentimental yet poignant. Anne Tyler is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of 20 brilliantly imagined and astute novels including The Accidental Tourist and Breathing Lessons. She lives in Baltimore, Maryland where most of her novels are set. Her latest novel A Spool of Blue Thread is published this month. The starting point for A Spool of Blue Thread came when I was listening to a friend talk about a family we know whose members take an almost comical pride in being special, even though they're as ordinary as breakfast cereal. I started thinking, "But really, doesn't every family think it's special, in some way? Aren't we all inordinately proud of some eccentric uncle, or some quirky ancestral trait?"   I'm interested in how families cling to a certain few inherited stories about themselves that they keep retelling over the years?only two or three of them.Why select those stories and not others? Are the choices significant in some way? One side of my own family could discuss forever the sad tale of my grandfather, who was sent as a four-year-old to borrow coffee from a neighbor because his mother was dying in childbirth and only coffee could save her?or so his elders told him. Of course that was only a ruse; they wanted to get him out of the house at a difficult moment. But he always thought she had died because he couldn't run fast enough, and he told that story all his life and we are still telling it to this day. As the Whitshanks tell theirstories; who knows exactly why?   I never identify with any of my characters, because the whole reason I write novels is to experience what it's like to be different people who bear no resemblance to me. But the Whitshanks' patriarch, Junior, is the one who most fascinated me as I was writing A SPOOL OF BLUE THREAD. When he finally came on the scene in person, after being much talked about, I felt a little thrill, as if somebody famous had arrived. "There he is! At last!" I liked the fact that he had unexpected inner qualities, and that the balance of power in his marriage was not what it first seemed.   When I started writing the novel, I did know the ending, but not the exact particulars of the family's disreputable origins. That was fun to explore?almost as if someone were tellingme the story and I was just waiting to hear how it would turn out.     It occurred to me after my last book that I'm happiest in the middle of a book but miserable when it's finished, when I have to expose it to the world. So I thought my next book should just go on and on until I died, and how better to do that than to cover many generations? The reason I chose to work backward through time instead of forward is that I worried I might run out of generations. Reversing the process, I could travel back endlessly through the greats and the great-greats for as long as I lived. But eventually it dawned on me that I wasn't all that interested in writing about the years prior to the twentieth century?and certainly not informed enough?so the book came to an end after all.   Something like the blue-thread episode happened to me after my mother died, and I made a note of it on an index card. "Spool of blue thread" was all the index card said, just to jog my memory; and when I saw the card years later as I was going through my file box for ideas, the phrase jumped out at me. I used it as the title because the actual blue-thread incident in the novel is so minor, I wanted to make sure people noticed it when they came upon it. To me, it's very important that Denny and his mother needed to forgive each other; the forgiveness shouldn't all flow in one direction.   I began keeping an index box because I kept forgetting the thoughts that came to me in the middle of the night. And always, of course, I imagined that I'd forgotten something earth-shattering and priceless. So I figured I should start writing those thoughts down. Some of the index cards have just a single word?a name I've run into that I'd like to use someday, a colloquialism that strikes me as interesting?and some have whole plots, such as "What exactly was the relationship between those two people I just passed?" or idle ruminations set in motion by some newspaper story. I fantasize I'll use the cards up one day, but more always seem to keep trickling in.   Do I have a favourite of my novels? I find I've developed a special attachment to this new book, but only time will tell whether it will permanently replace my longtime favourite, DINNER AT THE HOMESICK RESTAURANT. I've always had a warm spot in my heart for Ezra, the Homesick Restaurant's owner.   I write in an upstairs room that overlooks my street, because I like to have some sense of the rest of the world as I'm writing. If it's good weather, I'll open the windows. I enjoy hearing children's voices, and there have been several times when conversations among workmen have woven themselves into my novels.   I'm a firm believer in just showing up every morning?climbing the stairs to my writing room at roughly the same hour, right after my morning walk, and sitting down at my desk. Beyond that, I require nothing more of myself, no specific word count or minimum amount of time. Usually just sitting there with nothing better to do will eventually get me going. My next book will be a modern-day retelling of The Taming of the Shrew for the Shakespeare Hogarth series. So far, it's been a lot of fun, and certainly very different from anything I've tried before.   Buy A Spool Of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

Satin Island By Tom McCarthy

Satin Island By Tom McCarthy

'U' is a corporate anthropologist working for an elite consultancy. He must complete two tasks. The first is launching a great social project - the extent of which even his bosses don't understand. The second? The Great Report. A document to sum up our age. Instead he finds himself drifting through endless information - and trying to unlock a codex that could reveal the meaning of our times. Perhaps. Buy Satin Island By Tom McCarthy

The Year Of The Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota

The Year Of The Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota

The tale of an unlikely family thrown together by circumstance. Thirteen men live in a house in Sheffield, desperate to find a new life in Britain and leave the horrors of India behind. Many have secrets. Randeep's visa wife lives across town in a flat brimming with his clothes in case the border police call. The story transcends decades and places to reveal the true cost of starting again. Buy The Year Of The Runways By Sunjeev Sahota

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Four young graduates move to New York City together to pursue their dreams after college. Their friendship gets them through the toughest and most incredible of times. Withdrawn Jude keeps the group together but, the city itself isn't the biggest challenge they face, as the years pass by it's obvious that broken Jude needs them more than ever before. Fanny Blake's review of one she is very excited about plus below an interview with Anne Tyler "An extraordinarily powerful story of one man, Jude, whose damaged childhood affects him and everyone close to him. Spanning his lifetime, this novel about love and friendship is so compassionately told and compelling that I couldn?t stop reading. It?s one I?ll never forget. Brace yourself!" Buy A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

The Fisherman by Chigozie Obioma

The Fisherman by Chigozie Obioma

Small town Nigeria and four brothers use their strict father's absence to enjoy the simple pleasures of childhood, fishing in a forbidden river. A dangerous local madman threatens their bond with a prophecy of violence. What happens next is a tragic chain of events. Buy The Fisherman by Chigozie Obioma