The best book club books that will get the conversation (and wine) flowing

These book club books—from thrillers to romances, to thoughtful literary novels—will spark hours of discussion...

a collage image of eight of the books including in w&h's best book club books round-up
(Image credit: Future/Amazon)

Book club books aren't ones that you simply read and then place back on your shelf. They are the books you can't stop thinking about—the books you thrust into the hands of your friends and family because you are absolutely desperate to talk about it with someone. The stories that capture our imaginations, leave us exploring new ideas and open up interesting discussions.

The best book club books are ones that keep you up until the early hours. But they don't need to be literary works of art—some of the best romance books, or the best thriller books can make for fantastic book club reads too, allowing us to explore themes that relate to our own lives as well as challenging thoughts and opinions.

Featuring some of the best books of 2022 so far and authors to watch this year, these novels selected by our Books Editor Isabelle Broom should provide plenty to discuss at your next book group meeting...

The best book club books to read and discuss in 2022

From the best historical fiction books to the best mystery books, and everything in between—the titles chosen below are packed with topical and important talking points, mind-bending twists, laugh-out-loud observations and characters that will stay with you long after reading. 

Feel-good books

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Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid

When it comes to novels set behind the velvet rope, there is a clear winner at the helm in Malibu Rising—especially if you are craving a story that not only offers fun and frivolity, but also depth, humor, and characters that are every bit as frustrating, loveable and contrite as members of your own family. Taylor Jenkins Reid delves out all this and more in her 2021 novel, which takes place over 24 hours at a Malibu house party thrown by four famous siblings—surfer and model Nina, surfer Jay, photographer Hud, and the youngest, Kit. A sexy, scandalous tour de force, with really relatable characters that are sure to spark discussion.

Read it because: The love story is heart-wrenching, and you’ll be completely transported to another era through the spellbinding backstory.

A line we love: “Nina Riva stood on the edge of the cliff she'd never wanted and looked out onto the water she wished was closer, and for the first time in her quiet life, screamed into the wind.”


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The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

Beth O’Leary has a unique way with feel-good writing, and her debut bestselling novel The Flatshare is the best example. It follows the quirky home setup of upbeat Tiffy and her slightly more serious “flatmate” Leon, who share a bed but have never actually met each other. With a whole host other endearing and not-so-endearing characters, it’s a heartwarming but amusing read (with a couple of twists and turns) that shows us how the best situations can come out of the most unconventional of circumstances. A great one to choose if you want to explore the theme of unconventional and unexpected relationships.

Read it because: The chemistry between the two leads sizzles, while the story flows beautifully.

A line we love: “It’s weird how easily you can get to know someone from the traces they leave behind when they go.”


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Bad Choices by Lucy Vine

Lucy Vine’s knack for hilarity was introduced to us all in her number one bestselling Hot Mess and carried through to her subsequent releases, so it’s no surprise that her newest drop Bad Choices promises to leave us as breathless and blurry-eyed from laughter as its predecessors. One of the best book club books to read with your girlfriends, this one is all about the messy stories and nostalgic occasions of those ever-important codependent friendships we all had at some point in our youth.

Read it because: Not only is it hilarious, it’s also poignant in the most joyfully unpredictable way.

A line we love: “You have to feel your feelings, good and bad because otherwise you end up packing them in a box and pretending you’re fine. You tell yourself you’re in the right, that you deserve this, you’re owed this, instead of dealing with the truth.”


The Hidden Beach by Karen Swan
Karen Swan transports us to the historic city of Stockholm and the beautiful Swedish coast in this epic tale, where Bell Everhurst is working as a nanny for Hanna and Max. Looking after three children, life is ticking along, until Bell receives a call to say Hanna’s first husband has woken up from his coma, sending shockwaves through the family. This story of forgiveness will soon have you swept along and dreaming of Sweden—one of the best book club books for those with wanderlust.
Read it because: It’s emotionally hard-hitting with characters you cannot help but fall in love with.
A line we love: “The room remained empty and still. Vacated. Long ago abandoned. To reach for otherwise was a futile exercise in hope over experience, because if Life had taught him anything, it was that anything could happen. That fate was capricious and cruel. And no one could be trusted.” (opens in new tab)

The Hidden Beach by Karen Swan

Karen Swan transports us to the historic city of Stockholm and the beautiful Swedish coast in this epic tale, where Bell Everhurst is working as a nanny for Hanna and Max. Looking after three children, life is ticking along, until Bell receives a call to say Hanna’s first husband has woken up from his coma, sending shockwaves through the family. This story of forgiveness will soon have you swept along and dreaming of Sweden—one of the best book club books for those with wanderlust.

Read it because: It’s emotionally hard-hitting with characters you cannot help but fall in love with.

A line we love: “The room remained empty and still. Vacated. Long ago abandoned. To reach for otherwise was a futile exercise in hope over experience, because if Life had taught him anything, it was that anything could happen. That fate was capricious and cruel. And no one could be trusted.”


The Sight Of You by Holly Miller
This entrancing and beautifully written novel follows Joel and Callie, brought together, as if by fate. Only Joel doesn’t want to let anyone close. Haunted by dreams of what is going to happen to the people he loves, it’s no different when he meets Callie. He knows exactly how this ends. The question is, does he carry on living regardless? One of the most big-hearted of book club books that shows just how fragile life truly is, and a truly endearing story about love and loss.
Read it because: It is surprising, smart, emotional, and heart-breaking.
A line we love: “Really, I remind myself, we hardly know each other – just well enough for smiles and passing remarks, like stars from companion galaxies exchanging winks across swathes of limitless sky.” (opens in new tab)

The Sight Of You by Holly Miller

This entrancing and beautifully written novel follows Joel and Callie, brought together, as if by fate. Only Joel doesn’t want to let anyone close. Haunted by dreams of what is going to happen to the people he loves, it’s no different when he meets Callie. He knows exactly how this ends. The question is, does he carry on living regardless? One of the most big-hearted of book club books that shows just how fragile life truly is, and a truly endearing story about love and loss.

Read it because: It is surprising, smart, emotional, and heart-breaking.

A line we love: “Really, I remind myself, we hardly know each other – just well enough for smiles and passing remarks, like stars from companion galaxies exchanging winks across swathes of limitless sky.”


The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley
Lauded as one of the best feel-good novels of the last few years, Pooley quickly introduces us to a group of intriguing characters—none of them quite what they seem. Stricken with guilt about his past, flamboyant artist Julian Jessop wants to share his truth. But from the moment he writes it in a notebook and leaves it for someone to find, he couldn’t have imagined the impact it will have. This heartfelt and joyous read shows what it means to embrace who we really are.
Read it because: Of its quirky characters, the central message of hope, and because it may just make you gaze inward at your own life and find ways to make it more fulfilling.
A line we love: “You have such energy. You're like the sun. When you're interested in someone, you turn your rays towards them, and they luxuriate in your warmth. But then you turn somewhere else, leaving them in the shadow, and they spend all their energy trying to recreate the memory of your light.” (opens in new tab)

The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley

Lauded as one of the best feel-good novels of the last few years, Pooley quickly introduces us to a group of intriguing characters—none of them quite what they seem. Stricken with guilt about his past, flamboyant artist Julian Jessop wants to share his truth. But from the moment he writes it in a notebook and leaves it for someone to find, he couldn’t have imagined the impact it will have. This heartfelt and joyous read shows what it means to embrace who we really are.

Read it because: Of its quirky characters, the central message of hope, and because it may just make you gaze inward at your own life and find ways to make it more fulfilling.

A line we love: “You have such energy. You're like the sun. When you're interested in someone, you turn your rays towards them, and they luxuriate in your warmth. But then you turn somewhere else, leaving them in the shadow, and they spend all their energy trying to recreate the memory of your light.”


Saving Missy by Beth Morrey
In what’s been described as a ‘coming of old’ story, we meet prickly Millicent (Missy). Grieving for her husband, with a son living in Australia and a daughter she hasn’t spoken to for a year, she is lonely. That is until she meets two very different women who help her realise it doesn’t have to be that way. Featuring a cast of flawed but lovable characters, this is a story of friendship and having a second chance at life. This is one of the book club books to savour for days to come after you've finished it.
Read it because: Missy will win you over, page by sensitively crafted page.
A line we love: “Love was just love, that was all. Flawed, uneven, complicated, overlapping, but still essential.” (opens in new tab)

Saving Missy by Beth Morrey

In what’s been described as a ‘coming of old’ story, we meet prickly Millicent (Missy). Grieving for her husband, with a son living in Australia and a daughter she hasn’t spoken to for a year, she is lonely. That is until she meets two very different women who help her realise it doesn’t have to be that way. Featuring a cast of flawed but lovable characters, this is a story of friendship and having a second chance at life. This is one of the book club books to savour for days to come after you've finished it.

Read it because: Missy will win you over, page by sensitively crafted page.

A line we love: “Love was just love, that was all. Flawed, uneven, complicated, overlapping, but still essential.”


Crime/thriller books

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Magpie by Elizabeth Day

Marisa has only known Jake for a few months, but when he asks her to move in and start trying for a baby, it feels right. In Jake, she's found someone who will love and look after her the way she needs, and for a while, everything is perfect. But when lodger Kate arrives, Marisa is unnerved by how comfortable she seems in the house, how intimately she covets Jake and how interested she is in their baby. Just what is this stranger's story? Intelligent, twisty, and delicate in its handling of sensitive themes, Magpie is the thinking woman's thriller.

Read it because: It is oozing with foreboding and menace but has an ending far more hopeful than many psychological thrillers.

A line we love: She knew Jake disliked overt displays of affection because he found them insincere. After Marissa’s childhood experiences, where affection was supplied by her mother like heavy artillery in a battle with no clear end, she was relieved by Jake’s undemonstrative nature.”


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The Survivors by Jane Harper

 When Kieran returns home to the small town of Evelyn Bay on the Tasmania coast, he does so purely to help his parents pack up their house. He hasn't been back to the place in years, ever since the tragic events that saw three teenagers lose their lives at sea, yet Kieran has never been able to forget what happened, and neither, as it soon transpires, has anyone else. When the body of a young woman then washes up on the shore, it sparks an investigation that uncovers more than anyone could have predicted. A brooding and darkly atmospheric mystery.

Read it because: The descriptive passages are so exquisite that you will feel as if you’re watching a movie play out in your head.

A line we love: “The sea swelled again, and this time the drag of the undertow was strong enough that he took a step toward her. She didn’t notice. Her face was tilted down, the silver chain of her necklace glinting against her collarbone as she leaned forward to examine something in the water.”


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Kim Stone series by Angela Marsons

If you're looking for a stream of gripping book club books to carry your group through a good number of meets, then the Angela Marsons’ Kim Stone series is well worth your attention. Following the savvy but haunted Detective Inspector Kim Stone and her team as they endeavor to catch a different enigmatic serial killer in each installment, the series will leave you desperate to know what happens next at every corner, with multiple story arcs in each book and group of characters who you’ll end up feeling like you’ve known for a lifetime. If you’re a fan of Line of Duty, this one is definitely for you.

Read it because: Kim Stone is an engaging, multi-faceted lead character, and the entire series is smart and enthralling.

A line we love: “The innocence of the life taken was known to them all, but the pact had been made, and the secrets would be buried.”


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What You Did by Claire McGowan

When a group of university friends gets together after 20 years, friendships and relationships start to unravel after one of them is found bleeding and traumatized after claiming to have been assaulted by someone else in the house. Dark memories are brought to the surface for our protagonist as she is left questioning some of the supposedly best years of her life—and a hoard of twists and turns makes for a riveting group discussion that will make you forget all about your mandatory book club glass of wine.

Read it because: It’s pacey, tense, and will keep you guessing right to the end.

A line we love: “But still, the thing that was between them, it did not go away, it did not die, it just kept getting hungrier and hungrier, and sometimes the sheer power of it, of knowing she would do anything for it, hit her like a wave. It was wrong. But sometimes that didn’t matter.”


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The Perfect Wife by JP Delaney

Packed full of domestic suspense, The Perfect Wife explores the idea of perfection in a person and in a relationship through the lens of science, technology and resurrection. It begins as protagonist Abbie awakes to find that she doesn’t quite remember exactly who she is. Her husband—a tech expert and Silicon Valley legend—tells her she is an artist, surfer and loving wife and mother. But she is also something else entirely. After a horrible accident stole her life from her five years ago, her husband brought her back thanks to a technological breakthrough. As Abbie gets to know her new self and her new world, she is suspicious that her husband may not be all that he seems either.

Read it because: It’s a wholly original idea executed perfectly.

A line we love: “In the future, living forever will become as simple as making an upload.”


Liar by Lesley Pearse
Set in 1970s London, Pearse’s latest dark tale follows Amelia White, whose ambitions to become a reporter might just become reality when she discovers a murdered woman’s body. Determined to report the truth amid a media frenzy, more bodies begin to pile up, pushing her to the absolute limit. One of the most thrilling book club books on our list, and one that you'll definitely want to make sure you've ready before the next meeting to avoid spoilers!
Read it because: The backdrop of early-1970s London is captured brilliantly, and the mystery is weaved flawlessly throughout.
A line we love: “I saw the boots and thought someone had dumped them – I never expected they would be attached to legs.” (opens in new tab)

Liar by Lesley Pearse

Set in 1970s London, Pearse’s latest dark tale follows Amelia White, whose ambitions to become a reporter might just become reality when she discovers a murdered woman’s body. Determined to report the truth amid a media frenzy, more bodies begin to pile up, pushing her to the absolute limit. One of the most thrilling book club books on our list, and one that you'll definitely want to make sure you've ready before the next meeting to avoid spoilers!

Read it because: The backdrop of early-1970s London is captured brilliantly, and the mystery is weaved flawlessly throughout.

A line we love: “I saw the boots and thought someone had dumped them – I never expected they would be attached to legs.”


The Curator by M. W. Craven
Christmas may be the time for loving and giving, but when a sadistic serial killer begins displaying body parts across Cumbria, things get a whole lot darker. The National Crime Agency’s Washington Poe and Tilly Bradshaw now face a case that is as disturbing as it is difficult to unravel. Jaw-droppingly shocking and intense, there’s no escaping this novel’s tense narrative and tightly woven mystery.
Read it because: The twists are outrageously good, the plot fiendishly complex, and Poe a truly brilliant character.
A line we love: “Poe stood still and tried to untangle his mind. None of it felt right, some of the evidence contradicted other evidence – it was like trying to solve a Rubik's Cube that fought back.” (opens in new tab)

The Curator by M. W. Craven

Christmas may be the time for loving and giving, but when a sadistic serial killer begins displaying body parts across Cumbria, things get a whole lot darker. The National Crime Agency’s Washington Poe and Tilly Bradshaw now face a case that is as disturbing as it is difficult to unravel. Jaw-droppingly shocking and intense, there’s no escaping this novel’s tense narrative and tightly woven mystery.

Read it because: The twists are outrageously good, the plot fiendishly complex, and Poe a truly brilliant character.

A line we love: “Poe stood still and tried to untangle his mind. None of it felt right, some of the evidence contradicted other evidence – it was like trying to solve a Rubik's Cube that fought back.”


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The New Girl by Harriet Walker

Walker’s gripping thriller is against the backdrop of the— crazy, but arguably realistic—fashion industry. One of the more psychological book club books, this narrative explores friendship, motherhood, grief and betrayal, meaning it'll likely spawn all sorts of brilliant conversations. This has already been optioned as a film too, so you can just imagine how brilliant it is with someone willing to take it to Hollywood.

Read it because: It’s a lot of fun being taken behind the velvet rope of the fashion/showbiz world, and the characters and their struggles are relatable.

A line we love: “I laughed at my extra passenger when I thought about how impossible it was to smuggle in a plus one at these events – especially one who was so intent on discovering and demolishing whatever amuse-bouche happened to be offered on silver platters by waiters who looked like they’d been hewn from marble.”


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Lullaby by Leila Slimani

Compelling from the menacing opening line Lullaby is guaranteed to elicit a strong reaction from all readers, but given the fact that it’s about a nanny who murders the children in her care, it’s not one for the fainthearted. There are, however, heaps of talking points around class, race and family, so it ticks both the thinking and feeling boxes, which is what makes it one of the best book club books. Plus, it's also been made into a movie (making it one of the best book-to-movie (opens in new tab) adaptions on our list), so you can even discuss the book in two formats, if you wanted to. 

Read it because: The quiet menace will raise goosebumps on your skin, and the ending will leave you reeling for days.

A line we love: “And that was when she heard it. Most people live their whole lives without ever hearing a scream like that. It is the kind of scream heard during war, in the trenches, in other worlds, on other continents. It is not a scream from here.”


Literary books

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An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

A dive into the issues of prejudice, racism and injustice in the US told through the lens of a young couple’s loving but turbulent relationship, as Roy is sent away for 12 years for a crime that his wife Celestial knows that he didn’t commit. There’s much to discuss in this gripping read, not just the societal concerns but the nuances of couple relationships, not to mention the blockers that can arise among friendships. There are also interesting literary devices used throughout, with different points of view translated through diverse media.

Read it because: It is a thought-provoking, challenging, and utterly captivating novel that chooses truth over comfort, making it authentic and uncompromisingly human.

A line we love: “But this is what loss has taught me of love. Our house isn't simply empty, our home has been emptied. Love makes a place in your life; it makes a place for itself in your bed. Invisibly, it makes a place in your body, rerouting all your blood vessels, throbbing right alongside your heart. When it's gone, nothing is whole again.”


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Oh William! by Elizabeth Strout

A new novel by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Strout is a drop-everything-else moment—and we'd recommend you do, for this gloriously engaging book that once again stars the infinitely fascinating Lucy Barton. Through the story of Lucy's lifelong relationship with lover, husband, friend, and confidant William, Strout demonstrates her keen understanding and empathy of the human condition through characters that resonate, prose that strikes like a match at the emotions, and a story that could belong just as easily to us as to her indomitable narrator. A love story, but more importantly, a life story—and one that positively sings with perception.

Read it because: There is substance on every page, wisdom in every musing, and truth in every line.

A line we love: “But that night in the backseat of the car as we passed the snowy acres of land and I sort of heard my husband and his sister speaking quietly of their childhood, passing by billboards that said HIT BY A CAR? CALL HHR, I thought to myself: William is the only person I ever felt safe with. He is the only home I ever had.”


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Blue Ticket by Sophie Mackintosh

The most recent novel from the Man Booker long-listed author of The Water Cure imagines a world in which women are given a ticket on the day of their first period, informing them whether they will become a mother or not. A white ticket grants you children, while the blue ticket offers freedom from choice. But, as protagonist Calla is about to discover, things can go horribly wrong if the wrong ticket is issued. Delving into themes of motherhood, female instincts, and the balance of power between men and women, it boldly challenges the reader to face an unsettling what if, making it one of the best feminist books (opens in new tab) on our list.

Read it because: While it requires attention, the rewards are mesmerizing.

A line we love: “I was not fragile, I was not protectable, I was dark wind and dust blowing across a landscape, and there was nothing anybody could do for me.” 


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Fault Lines by Emily Itami

Japanese housewife Mizuki lives in a beautiful Tokyo apartment with her husband and two children. By rights, she should be happy, yet she often fantasizes about throwing herself off the balcony—anything to break the monotony. Then into her life one rainy night comes restauranteur Kiyoshi, and through him, Mizuki rediscovers her passion for the vibrant city, for life, and freedom. The further she falls, the deeper Mizuki strays towards a point of no return, and soon she is faced with a difficult choice. A love story with a difference that introduces a fresh and exciting new literary voice, and that sparks a conversation about conventional family roles.

Read it because: The bustling, hectic city of Tokyo is so well captured on the page.

A line we love: “All of it was thrilling, like playing make-believe. Singing made me high. Every cliché that has ever been used to describe singing is true for me. When I sing, I’m free. It’s like I’ve disappeared, and all there is is music, and I’m swimming in the current of every feeling I’ve ever had.”


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Sorrow And Bliss by Meg Mason

When a book is recommended by almost every person you encounter, you can be confident that something extremely special is in store—and this is very much the case with the achingly poignant, painfully human, and darkly humorous Sorrow And Bliss. When we join Martha at the start of the novel, she is at her 40th birthday party with her husband Patrick and is very much not okay. The reasons why become apparent as we travel with Martha back to childhood, meet her eccentric British family and witness her myriad struggles as she grapples with mental illness. An exquisite modern classic.

Read it because: As a novel, it is as sublime and near perfect as they come.

A line we love: “At night I read until I fell asleep and wherever I was, every time somebody in a book wanted something, I wrote down what it was. Once I had finished them all, I had so many torn-off bits of paper, collected in a jar on Ingrid's dresser. But they all said, a person, a family, a home, money, to not be alone. That is all anybody wants.”


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The Paper Palace by Miranda Cowley Heller

Penned by the former Head of Drama Series at HBO, captivating debut The Paper Palace has the caliber of unforgettability that publishers dream about. Opening with 50-year-old mother-of-three Elle awakening at the Cape Cod house where she spends all her summers, the narrative then takes us on a journey not just back to the events of the previous evening—when Elle had sex with Jonas on the lawn while their respective partners chatted away indoors—but to the mid-50s when they initially met. Elle has a choice to make about her future happiness, but first, she must revisit the past.

Read it because: The prose is luminous, the plot thought-provoking, and surprises are sprinkled like seasoning throughout.

A line we love: “Every single time I see the ocean, even if I’ve been there in the morning, it feels like a new miracle – its power, its blueness always just as overwhelming. Like falling in love.”


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Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr

One for lovers of writing, this new novel from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of All The Light We Cannot See is a cross-generational study of enduring hope in the face of war, the power of knowledge, and how stories continue to teach readers what it means to be human. Set inside the walls of Constantinople, an Idaho library with a devastating hidden secret and an interstellar ship of the future, it interlaces characters through their love of the story of Aethon, who dreamed of becoming a bird so he could fly up to a Utopian world. A magical, meaningful book.

Read it because: Anthony Doerr’s descriptions are a veritable feast for the senses.

A line we love: “Hope is the pillar that holds up the world.”


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Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

Can you really have book club books list without an appearance from Sally Rooney? Well, we’re eschewing her famous Normal People for the *slightly* lesser-known Conversations with Friends—because after all, isn’t that what a book club is really about? This follows aspiring writer Frances and her best friend Bobbi, who get swept up into the world of literary hubbubs, fancy houses and luxury holidays when they befriend a glamorous couple with whom they start a complex relationship.

Read it because: Rooney is not afraid to delve deep into the psychology of her characters, and whether you love or hate them, they are some of the most real in modern fiction.

A line we love: “Gradually the waiting began to feel less like waiting and more like this was simply what life was: the distracting tasks undertaken while the thing you are waiting for continues not to happen.”


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Luster by Raven Leilani

Protagonist Edie finds herself in a complicated situation in this award-winning Sunday Times bestseller, after she finds herself in a relationship with a white, middle-aged married man whose wife is semi-open to an open relationship. She then meets the pair’s adopted black daughter who doesn’t have anyone else in her life who looks like herself. Edie finds herself falling into this family’s life with the backdrop of racial and sexual politics providing interesting discussion points.

Read it because: There is so much rawness and energy flowing through the book, and Edie is a complex and fascinating character.

A line we love: “He wants me to be myself like a leopard might be herself in a city zoo. Inert, waiting to be fed. Not out in the wild, with a tendon in her teeth.”


The Tenth Muse by Catherine Chung
Katherine has always felt like an outsider in her community, both as the child of an interracial relationship and as a gifted mathematician. Guiding the reader deftly through her family history, Katherine’s own life becomes the ultimate puzzle as discoveries lead her to examine who she really is. A truly spellbinding read well worth checking out.
Read it because: It is inspiring, transportive, and erudite.
A line we love: “What terrible things we do to each other. What terrible things we do in the name of love.” (opens in new tab)

The Tenth Muse by Catherine Chung

Katherine has always felt like an outsider in her community, both as the child of an interracial relationship and as a gifted mathematician. Guiding the reader deftly through her family history, Katherine’s own life becomes the ultimate puzzle as discoveries lead her to examine who she really is. A truly spellbinding read well worth checking out.

Read it because: It is inspiring, transportive, and erudite.

A line we love: “What terrible things we do to each other. What terrible things we do in the name of love.”


The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
What if you had the chance to open a book and try another life you might have lived? In this life-affirming read, Nora Seed does just that when she discovers the secret power of the Midnight Library. Now she gets to see what could have been if she’d taken that job, joined her brother’s band or stayed with that man, by selecting one of its many books. Thought-provoking and compelling—you’ll soon be swept along for the ride.
Read it because: The clever concept maintains its grip, while the message you take away is one of hope and self-acceptance.
A line we love: “If you aim to be something you are not, you will always fail. Aim to be you. Aim to look and act and think like you. Aim to be the truest version of you. Embrace that you-ness. Endorse it. Love it. Work hard at it. And don't give a second thought when people mock it or ridicule it. Most gossip is envy in disguise.” (opens in new tab)

The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

What if you had the chance to open a book and try another life you might have lived? In this life-affirming read, Nora Seed does just that when she discovers the secret power of the Midnight Library. Now she gets to see what could have been if she’d taken that job, joined her brother’s band or stayed with that man, by selecting one of its many books. Thought-provoking and compelling—you’ll soon be swept along for the ride.

Read it because: The clever concept maintains its grip, while the message you take away is one of hope and self-acceptance.

A line we love: “If you aim to be something you are not, you will always fail. Aim to be you. Aim to look and act and think like you. Aim to be the truest version of you. Embrace that you-ness. Endorse it. Love it. Work hard at it. And don't give a second thought when people mock it or ridicule it. Most gossip is envy in disguise.”


The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett
After running away from their small, southern black community, the Vignes twins’ paths diverge dramatically. Ten years later, one sister lives in very the town she left, while the other passes secretly for a white woman. This is a truly thought-provoking read that reflects American history and society.
Read it because: So many books are touted as being “unforgettable”, but this one truly is.
A line we love: “People thought that being one of a kind made you special. No, it just made you lonely. What was special was belonging with someone else.” (opens in new tab)

The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

After running away from their small, southern black community, the Vignes twins’ paths diverge dramatically. Ten years later, one sister lives in very the town she left, while the other passes secretly for a white woman. This is a truly thought-provoking read that reflects American history and society.

Read it because: So many books are touted as being “unforgettable”, but this one truly is.

A line we love: “People thought that being one of a kind made you special. No, it just made you lonely. What was special was belonging with someone else.”


The Confession by Jessie Burton
It’s hard not to fall in love with Jessie Burton’s hypnotic prose, and The Confession is no exception. In this absorbing tale of self-discovery, successful writer Constance Holden and Elise Morceau meet by chance in 1980. When Elise follows Connie to glamorous LA, it’s not long before Elise makes a decision that changes everything. Sure to resonate with anyone who’s ever questioned who they are or the decisions they make, this is a wonderful, compelling book you’ll want to read again the minute you’ve finished!
Read it because: The characters are alive, the plotting seamless, and the writing exquisite.
A line we love: “I have known happiness – but I feel as if I can taste other people’s happiness much more strongly than I can my own.” (opens in new tab)

The Confession by Jessie Burton

It’s hard not to fall in love with Jessie Burton’s hypnotic prose, and The Confession is no exception. In this absorbing tale of self-discovery, successful writer Constance Holden and Elise Morceau meet by chance in 1980. When Elise follows Connie to glamorous LA, it’s not long before Elise makes a decision that changes everything. Sure to resonate with anyone who’s ever questioned who they are or the decisions they make, this is a wonderful, compelling book you’ll want to read again the minute you’ve finished!

Read it because: The characters are alive, the plotting seamless, and the writing exquisite.

A line we love: “I have known happiness – but I feel as if I can taste other people’s happiness much more strongly than I can my own.”


Do Not Feed the Bear by Rachel Elliot
Sydney is a free runner and always on the move, never quite coming to terms with a tragic event that took place in her past. As her forty-seventh birthday approaches, her partner Ruth wants them to celebrate together, but instead Sidney is standing on a rooftop in St Ives preparing to jump. Facing up to her guilt and grief, she soon encounters the kindness of strangers. Beautifully written, Elliot’s unique and mesmerizing voice pulls you along effortlessly.
Read it because: It will remind you that it is never too late to start living the life you want.
A line we love: “Without hope all we have is nostalgia.” (opens in new tab)

Do Not Feed the Bear by Rachel Elliot

Sydney is a free runner and always on the move, never quite coming to terms with a tragic event that took place in her past. As her forty-seventh birthday approaches, her partner Ruth wants them to celebrate together, but instead Sidney is standing on a rooftop in St Ives preparing to jump. Facing up to her guilt and grief, she soon encounters the kindness of strangers. Beautifully written, Elliot’s unique and mesmerizing voice pulls you along effortlessly.

Read it because: It will remind you that it is never too late to start living the life you want.

A line we love: “Without hope all we have is nostalgia.”

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
When a novel has been chosen as Reese Witherspoon’s book club pick, you know it’s going to be all sorts of incredible—and should be on your own book club books list! Exploring themes such as motherhood, identity and the crippling weight of secrets, the story begins with the youngest child of the prominent Richardson family setting fire to their home, and continues to enthrall throughout.
Read it because: It is wholly absorbing and will challenge you with its unflinching honesty.
A line we love: “It came, over and over, down to this: What made someone a mother? Was it biology alone, or was it love?” (opens in new tab)

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

When a novel has been chosen as Reese Witherspoon’s book club pick, you know it’s going to be all sorts of incredible—and should be on your own book club books list! Exploring themes such as motherhood, identity and the crippling weight of secrets, the story begins with the youngest child of the prominent Richardson family setting fire to their home, and continues to enthrall throughout.

Read it because: It is wholly absorbing and will challenge you with its unflinching honesty.

A line we love: “It came, over and over, down to this: What made someone a mother? Was it biology alone, or was it love?”


Historical books

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Ariadne by Jennifer Saint

If you loved Classic and mythology in school or were a fan of Madeleine Miller’s bestselling Circe, then Jennifer Saint’s Ariadne should be on your radar for the best book club books. It tells the story of the famous Theseus and the Minotaur but from the perspective of Ariadne, the Minotaur’s sister. Ariadne falls in love with Theseus, Prince of Athens, when he arrives on their island, but pledging her allegiance to him means betraying her own flesh and blood. The wonderfully-written debut novel gives a voice to important women of Greek mythology.

Read it because: It has so many moments of beauty.

A line we love: “I had been a fool to trust in a hero: a man who could only love the mighty echo of his own name throughout the centuries.”


Spirited by Julie Cohen
Incorporating the supernatural into a beautifully realised historical setting, Julie Cohen brings us Viola and Henriette, a pair of Victorian women bonded together by love and courage. Following the loss of her father, Viola’s grief is lifted only by photography, though her pictures appear to pick up spirits that are otherwise invisible. Meeting Henriette, a spirit medium, only draws her further into this other world. Wonderfully written and evocative.
Read it because: The complexities of the era are captured perfectly, the narrative balanced and engaging, and the tone warm and realistic.
A line we love: “In that moment, he felt complete. Not without grief, but as if his grief had been transmuted into something else, something pure, stripped of all the many layers of betrayal. The touch of two hands in the darkness.” (opens in new tab)

Spirited by Julie Cohen

Incorporating the supernatural into a beautifully realised historical setting, Julie Cohen brings us Viola and Henriette, a pair of Victorian women bonded together by love and courage. Following the loss of her father, Viola’s grief is lifted only by photography, though her pictures appear to pick up spirits that are otherwise invisible. Meeting Henriette, a spirit medium, only draws her further into this other world. Wonderfully written and evocative.

Read it because: The complexities of the era are captured perfectly, the narrative balanced and engaging, and the tone warm and realistic.

A line we love: “In that moment, he felt complete. Not without grief, but as if his grief had been transmuted into something else, something pure, stripped of all the many layers of betrayal. The touch of two hands in the darkness.”


A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende
A gripping novel for our times, this confirms – again – that Allende is a consummate storyteller. Starting at the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, and ending in 1994, we follow two remarkable characters—Rose and Victor—as they flee Franco’s dictatorship and board a ship to Chile, commissioned by the poet Pablo Neruda. Historical fact is exquisitely interwoven with personal stories. This is a stunning portrayal of love, courage, and hope.
Read it because: This novel is Allende at her very best, weaving an epic family saga that you cannot help but become immersed in.
A line we love: “Nothing can grow in the shade of secrets, she would say, love needs light and space to flourish.” (opens in new tab)

A Long Petal of the Sea by Isabel Allende

A gripping novel for our times, this confirms – again – that Allende is a consummate storyteller. Starting at the end of the Spanish Civil War in 1939, and ending in 1994, we follow two remarkable characters—Rose and Victor—as they flee Franco’s dictatorship and board a ship to Chile, commissioned by the poet Pablo Neruda. Historical fact is exquisitely interwoven with personal stories. This is a stunning portrayal of love, courage, and hope.

Read it because: This novel is Allende at her very best, weaving an epic family saga that you cannot help but become immersed in.

A line we love: “Nothing can grow in the shade of secrets, she would say, love needs light and space to flourish.”


This Lovely City by Louise Hare
In her debut novel, Louise Hare transports us to post-war London. It’s 1950 and jazz musician and new arrival Lawrie has taken lodgings and fallen in love. Touring the music halls of Soho by night, by day he works as a postman. But when he makes a terrible discovery, he becomes the prime suspect. It soon becomes clear that the new arrivals from the Caribbean may not be as welcome as they’d been led to believe. A thought-provoking mystery.
Read it because: The social history and setting are endlessly fascinating. This is so much more than a simple murder mystery.
A line we love: “Stiff upper lip, put on a brave face and pretend that if you can ignore the horrors of the past and think only of the future, then you too will be all right. This was an island of crazy people.” (opens in new tab)

This Lovely City by Louise Hare

In her debut novel, Louise Hare transports us to post-war London. It’s 1950 and jazz musician and new arrival Lawrie has taken lodgings and fallen in love. Touring the music halls of Soho by night, by day he works as a postman. But when he makes a terrible discovery, he becomes the prime suspect. It soon becomes clear that the new arrivals from the Caribbean may not be as welcome as they’d been led to believe. A thought-provoking mystery.

Read it because: The social history and setting are endlessly fascinating. This is so much more than a simple murder mystery.

A line we love: “Stiff upper lip, put on a brave face and pretend that if you can ignore the horrors of the past and think only of the future, then you too will be all right. This was an island of crazy people.”


The Silent Hours by Cesca Major
Following the fates of three souls in France during WW2, this meticulously researched and faultlessly authentic tale reimagines the events that occurred around a real and devastating tragedy. The author has taken this foundation of truth and built an absorbing yet sensitive narrative, one which feels both believable and necessary. A real gem, and a must-read for historical fiction fans—and one you won't stop talking about with friends.
Read it because: It’s a powerful story that once read is impossible to forget.
A line we love: “When a German soldier is running at you, there's no point quoting Virgil at him, you're better off kicking a football in his face.” (opens in new tab)

The Silent Hours by Cesca Major

Following the fates of three souls in France during WW2, this meticulously researched and faultlessly authentic tale reimagines the events that occurred around a real and devastating tragedy. The author has taken this foundation of truth and built an absorbing yet sensitive narrative, one which feels both believable and necessary. A real gem, and a must-read for historical fiction fans—and one you won't stop talking about with friends.

Read it because: It’s a powerful story that once read is impossible to forget.

A line we love: “When a German soldier is running at you, there's no point quoting Virgil at him, you're better off kicking a football in his face.”

Small Pleasures by Clare Chambers
This exquisite novel set in 1950s post-war London, follows the journey of discovery taken by features writer, Jean Swinney. Her world is turned upside down when she is sent off to investigate Gretchen Tilbury’s supposed ‘virgin birth’. Before long, her life becomes intertwined with the Tilburys—and there will be a price to pay. A stunning novel that will quickly steal your heart.
Read it because: The agony you will feel upon finishing it is of the exquisite kind – that which makes you pull all those you love a little closer.
A line we love: “The journey into love was so effortless and graceful; the journey out such a long and laboured climb.” (opens in new tab)

Small Pleasures by Clare Chambers

This exquisite novel set in 1950s post-war London, follows the journey of discovery taken by features writer, Jean Swinney. Her world is turned upside down when she is sent off to investigate Gretchen Tilbury’s supposed ‘virgin birth’. Before long, her life becomes intertwined with the Tilburys—and there will be a price to pay. A stunning novel that will quickly steal your heart.

Read it because: The agony you will feel upon finishing it is of the exquisite kind – that which makes you pull all those you love a little closer.

A line we love: “The journey into love was so effortless and graceful; the journey out such a long and laboured climb.”


The Garden Of Lost And Found by Harriet Evans 
Set in both 1919 and the present day, this is a sweeping epic of a tale that unfurls the fates and fortunes of the Horner family, who lived in happy idyll at Nightingale House until one summer day changed everything. Arty, evocative, blissful and boasting a fabulous cast, it’s a mystery that you will want to share with everyone.
Read it because: The descriptions are vivid, the characters well-rounded, and the doll’s house sequences a delightful bonus.
A line we love: “The memories, you see, they caught in her throat. That time, all those times.” (opens in new tab)

The Garden Of Lost And Found by Harriet Evans 

Set in both 1919 and the present day, this is a sweeping epic of a tale that unfurls the fates and fortunes of the Horner family, who lived in happy idyll at Nightingale House until one summer day changed everything. Arty, evocative, blissful and boasting a fabulous cast, it’s a mystery that you will want to share with everyone.

Read it because: The descriptions are vivid, the characters well-rounded, and the doll’s house sequences a delightful bonus.

A line we love: “The memories, you see, they caught in her throat. That time, all those times.”


Real-life/autobiographical books

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Untamed by Glennon Doyle

Written partly as a memoir and partly to inspire readers, Untamed is an autobiographical insight into how speaker and activist Glennon Doyle defied convention and societal expectation to find her happiest self and live her happiest life. It’s an intimate story that touches on all aspects of life, from relationships to motherhood to society and our relationships with our bodies and our minds and is full of inspirational life quotes (opens in new tab)

Read it because: Glennon Doyle is not afraid to be vulnerable, and it is refreshing to read a memoir so untarnished by what is expected of its author.

A line we love: “Being human is not hard because you're doing it wrong, it's hard because you're doing it right.”


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The Salt Path by Raynor Winn

This is the captivating true story of a couple who embarked on a walk along the South West Coast Path. Raynor writes about losing her home and her husband Moth’s terminal illness with lyricism and poignancy, evoking the rich beauty of Britain’s coastline and the best lighthouses in the UK (opens in new tab) as she does so. While it is sad, there is tenderness here, and there is hope, too.

Read it because: It is incredibly inspiring, poignant, and deeply emotive.

A line we love: “Were we searching this narrow margin between the land and sea for another way of being, becoming edgelanders along the way? Stuck between one world and the next. Walking a thin line between tame and wild, lost and found, life and death. At the edge of existence.”


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This Is Going To Hurt by Adam Kay

Also on our list of the best audiobooks (opens in new tab), comedian Adam Kay’s dedication to the NHS and his description of life on the front line of the medical service is one book you need to grab at your earliest opportunity, even if you've watched the This Is Going To Hurt TV adaptation (opens in new tab) on the BBC already. The former junior doctor’s diary entries will make you cringe, chuckle and weep in equal measure. Adam penned the novel in secret in between shifts at the hospital, and it's a fascinating look into the life of a medical worker. 

Read it because: Not only is it shocking, eye-opening, and often hilarious, it is also a call to arms to protect and support our incredible NHS.

A line we love: “So I told them the truth: the hours are terrible, the pay is terrible, the conditions are terrible; you’re underappreciated, unsupported, disrespected and frequently physically endangered. But there’s no better job in the world.”

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Becoming by Michelle Obama

A supremely popular choice, this memoir is one everyone should have on their list. Michelle never sought to be a political celebrity and she arguably lives in the shadow of Barack’s status. But her career is equally as impressive and the memoir—latterly—details the journey of how she used her status in advocating for change and how brilliantly she did so. But it was not a fairytale trajectory—IVF, miscarriage, relationship counseling, family death as well as career and familial struggles are all shared. But her formidable intelligence, humor, courage, and humanity shine through.

Read it because: There is much we can learn from the former First Lady, and she shares so much of that wisdom here.

A line we love: “For me, becoming isn’t about arriving somewhere or achieving a certain aim. I see it instead as forward motion, a means of evolving, a way to reach continuously toward a better self. The journey doesn’t end.”