This very common sleeping habit could double your risk of cardiovascular disease

Time to whip your snoozing routine into shape!
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  • The sleeping habit that could double your risk of having cardiovascular disease has been revealed- and it’s something that so many of us are guilty of.

    According to a new study, sticking to a regular bed time and sleeping in on the weekend could result in us doubling our risk of developing cardiovascular disease in later life.

    The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found that older adults with an irregular sleeping schedule are twice as likely to suffer from heart and blood vessel issues as those who maintain a regular bedtime routine- like hose who get the same amount of sleep each night within the same time frame.

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    The study tracked almost 2,000 men and women between the ages of 45 and 84 over five years of sleep examinations.

    None of the participants began the study with cardiovascular disease but over the course of five years 111 of them experienced cardiovascular issues, such as heart attack or stroke, or died from cardiovascular disease related issues.

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    It was found that the most irregular sleep patterns had more than double the risk of cardiovascular disease than those who had solid sleeping and waking up schedules.

    It is thought by researchers that this was a result of irregular sleep’s impact on the body’s circadian rhythm, which can negatively impact the metabolism and result in diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol.

    “We hope that our study will help raise awareness about the potential importance of a regular sleep pattern in improving heart health. It is a new frontier in sleep medicine,” said lead study author and epidemiologist Tianyi Huang.

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