W&H Beauty Ed tries the Hydrafacial, here’s what she thought…  

I’ve been in a bit of a beauty treatment quandary lately (I know, it's not exactly a bad problem to have)

My skin is changing. It’s a little more lined, a little less radiant, and though I’m not quite ready to go down an invasive or injectable route, I need something more than your average pampering facial can offer. I want a treatment with muscle, one that gives my skin a kick up the proverbial but without needles, downtime or the risk of taking on that unmistakable “worked on” veneer. Enter Hydrafacial.

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“It’s a great starter treatment,” agrees Rowena Jackson, Nurse Aesthetic Practitioner at Mallucci London, the very chic – and discreet – clinic I visit to find out more. “The Hydrafacial removes the build up of pollution and dead skin cells across the face, but also nourishes the skin with hyaluronic acid, peptides and antioxidants. Everyone seems to want the Hydrafacial right now, and we can use it to get to know someone’s skin before they decide to have anything else.”

The Mallucci London Clinic

So far, so appealing. But this isn’t your typical relaxing facial. The reason the Hydrafacial is known as a serious glow giver is because the process is just that – serious, meaning machines are involved, several of them. First up is the lymphatic drainage massage, which – you guessed it – helps your lymph nodes drain excess fluid and flush out toxins, and is administered via a device that I can only describe as a tiny hoover nozzle. Not that there’s anything unpleasant about having said nozzle ran over my face, gently tugging the skin like an oddly satisfying reverse massage.

Next up comes the vortex. This little pen-like gadget sounds very villain in Avengers 8 (or whatever they’re on now) but feels simply cool and satisfying as it whirrs over my skin, using concentrated water and air to flush debris out and push good antioxidant-packed stuff in. Some peeling acids follow, which can be customised to your skin type, and was the only bit of the treatment I found slightly uncomfortable. In fairness Rowena warned me it could prickle, and could have called time on the acids if it had become too much, which it didn’t. I like a bit of prickle, to me it says results incoming.

Then came a soothing LED mask combining anti-inflammatory red light with antibacterial blue, and a liberal smothering in hydrating skincare to see me on my way. A look in the mirror confirmed what I already knew – a pink ever-so-slightly blotchy face. As a pale Scot with reactive skin this is standard stuff, but by the time I emerged on the other side of my tube journey it had completely disappeared, leaving only smooth skin in its wake. Skin so ridiculously smooth I had stuff my hands in my pockets to stop myself stroking it. Mitts that have recently been in contact with London public transport should be kept well away from a baby fresh skin cells.

I avoided my usual retinols and acids for a couple of days, simply hydrating my peachy new complexion, and noticed that my makeup wasn’t settling into little dry patches and pores any more. A week later I experienced the famed ‘Hydrafacial glow’ so much so that I headed into work after a yoga class with zero makeup on and happily stayed that way all day (very unlike me) After a month, which is roughly the time it takes for your skin cells to turn over and new collagen to start coming through,  that indefinable freshness remained and the little under the skin breakouts I was experiencing pre-Hydra hadn’t returned.

Of course all this action comes at a price – £200 for one go or £550 for three – but considering a very average facial can ring in at £100+ (or Botox three times that) if you’re looking to invest in a serious results-driven treatment I couldn’t speak more highly of the Hydrafacial. The results get cumulatively better, so a course would be a brilliant idea in the run up to a big event. I’m planning my next appointment around a wedding in May, and based on my skin the last time we met, the Bride’s thinking of booking in too.

For more information, visit mallucci-london.com

Apester Lazyload