Victoria Beckham swears by LED face masks for younger-looking skin - here's why

Victoria Beckham's face mask might make you look like a Stormtrooper but its skin benefits are second to none.

LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 19: Victoria Beckham is seen at 'Jimmy Kimmel Live' on November 19, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by RB/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)
(Image credit: RB/Bauer-Griffin /Getty Images)

Face masks have flooded our Instagram feeds since the beginning of the pandemic. Steering clear of gloopy, homespun versions, Victoria Beckham's face mask of choice, however, is a high-tech LED mask, prized for its anti-inflammatory and anti-ageing powers.

She's not alone. Chrissy Teigen and January Jones also wax lyrical about this piece of beauty tech that's changing the way we mask. LED masks might look frightening (or, perhaps perfectly Instagrammable), but these futuristic devices are actually a quick and effective way to plump and hydrate lacklustre dry skin (opens in new tab).

What are LED face masks?

Like a high-tech sheet mask, LED face masks use red and near-infrared lights to reduce inflammation, encourage healing and boost collagen production. But that’s not all, says co-founder of The Light Salon, Laura Ferguson. 

"LED face masks improve blood flow and tissue oxygenation through a process called 'photobiomodulation'," explains Ferguson. "This means your skin will have improved hydration levels and increased firmness. LED also helps to re-charge the ‘energy’ battery in the skin to repair and rejuvenate damaged cells. A cell that has been charged by light is able to perform 150-200% more efficiently."

All of which is good news for the skincare you apply directly afterwards, as not only will it penetrate better but its effects will be turbo-charged by these re-energised cells. 

Of course, Victoria isn't new to utting-edge technology backed by clinical results. Founder of Victoria Beckham Beauty (opens in new tab), she collaborated with eminent stem cell scientist Augustinus Bader for her Cell Rejuvenating Priming Moisturizer (opens in new tab)and Cell Rejuvenating Power Serum (opens in new tab)

Both products feature Bader’s TFC8 technology - natural amino acids, medicine-grade vitamins and synthesized molecules - designed to fire up your skin’s own repair process. 

On her Instagram stories, the star eloquently explained the benefits of LED after she was sent Australian brand Opera's LED Light Therapy Mask (opens in new tab):

‘Red light is for collagen and blood flow. White light is anti-inflammatory, healing and firming. Blue is antibacterial and so good for blemish prone skin,’ says Victoria.

The best LED face masks

The Light Salon Boost LED Mask, $495, Net-A-Porter £395] (opens in new tab)

A perennial favourite with beauty editors, its 20 minute-dose of light and flexible fit makes it an easy addition to your skincare routine (opens in new tab). Even though it’s not the same power as The Light Salon's professional machines, if you use the mask three times a week over a four-week period, it delivers the equivalent cumulative dose of light as one salon treatment if you went once a week for the same period.

The Light Salon Boost LED Mask

(Image credit: Net-A-Porter)

CurrentBody Skin LED Light Therapy Mask, $355 [£265] (opens in new tab)

The original flexible mask, this mask is clinically proven to reduce wrinkles by 35% in just 4 weeks. Pretty impressive. 

Current Body Skin LED Mask

(Image credit: Current Body)

MZ Skin Light-Therapy Golden Facial Treatment Device, £385, Net-A-Porter (opens in new tab)

What sets this device by aesthetic doctor Maryam Zamani apart from the others is that it has five colored light settings that each promote different benefits for an overall radiant complexion. Red LED light stimulates the production of collagen and elastin; blue LED minimizes bacteria to clarify blemish-prone skin; green LED improves the look of broken capillaries and pigmentation (opens in new tab); yellow LED boosts circulation and white minimises inflammation in sensitive skin (opens in new tab)

MZ Skin LED mask

(Image credit: Net-A-Porter)

Fiona Embleton is a beauty writer who is now Acting Beauty Editor at Stylist. She is obsessed with Isabel Marant and cats.