How one of Queen's 'first successes' showed generations of women they could embrace ‘confident femininity’

Her Majesty is known for her love of bright colors and it seems her choice of clothing sent a powerful message to ‘generations’...

One of the Queen's 'first successes' was her unique sense of style, seen here smiling during a visit to the Edinburgh Climate Change Institute
(Image credit: Photo by Jane Barlow - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

One of the Queen’s “first successes” reportedly showcased how much she was embracing her own “confident femininity” and inspired others to do the same. 


The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee 2022 celebrations are almost here and whilst many people will be eagerly anticipating the appearance of Her Majesty and other members of the extended Royal Family on the Buckingham Palace balcony, what she’ll wear will likely be on other fans’ minds. Throughout her 70 years on the throne, Her Majesty has demonstrated an iconic flair for bold dressing. And if you know your facts about the Queen well, you’ll perhaps already know how she reportedly loves bright colors so that she can stand out in crowds.

Now it’s been suggested that her unique fashion sense was one of the Queen's "first successes" and displayed a powerful message of “confident femininity”. 

Queen Elizabeth II attends the OUTSOURCING Inc. Royal Windsor Cup Final

(Image credit: Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for OUT-SOURCING Inc)

Opening up to Harper’s Bazaar (opens in new tab), author and historian Amanda Foreman expressed her belief that Her Majesty’s unique sense of style as one of the earliest major triumphs of her 70 year reign. 

“Indeed, establishing her own sense of fashion was one of the first successes of Elizabeth II’s reign,” she explained before describing how multi-functional the Queen’s outfits are.

She continued, “Its essence was pure glamor, but the designs were performing a double duty: nothing could be too patterned, too hot, too shiny and too sheer, or else it wouldn’t photograph well.” 

And it seems when it comes to the Queen’s wardrobe, the monarch opted early on in her reign to perfect her own approach to feminine dressing despite the expectations placed upon fellow icons at the time. 

Queen Elizabeth II of England at Balmoral Castle with one of her Corgis, 28th September 1952.

(Image credit: Bettmann via Getty)

“Her wardrobe carried the subversive message that dresses should be made to work for the wearer, not the other way around,” Amanda shared. “In an era where female celebrity was becoming increasingly tied to ‘sexiness’, the Queen offered a different kind of confident femininity.”

Known for her love of vibrant hues, color-blocking is definitely one of the secrets of Her Majesty’s style. It’s a style tip that Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle have both borrowed from the Queen over the years and the historian and author remarked upon how the monarch’s choice of vibrant colors showed others that they could stand out elegantly too.

Amanda disclosed, “Never afraid to wear bright blocks of color, she has encouraged generations of women to think beyond merely blending in.” 

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Whilst the establishment of her bold personal style might’ve been one of the Queen’s “first successes”, her outfits have continued to inspire and delight fans. Now many of the most iconic of the Queen’s fashion moments are set to be honored with an intriguing new display. 

Delving into their archives, Madame Tussauds is giving visitors a unique look at seven stunning gowns worn by the Queen’s many waxwork figures over the years as the Jubilee weekend approaches. 

Emma is a Senior Lifestyle Writer with six years of experience working in digital publishing. Her specialist areas including literature, the British Royal Family and knowing all there is to know about the latest TV shows on the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and every streaming service out there. When she’s not writing about the next unmissable show to add to your to-watch list or delving into royal protocol, you can find Emma cooking and watching yet more crime dramas.