18 low calorie non-alcoholic drinks in a can, tried and tasted by us

All of these low calorie non-alcoholic drinks are under 100 calories per serving, perfect for summer

A selection of the best low calorie non-alcoholic drinks in a can
(Image credit: Humble Warrior/TRIP/Punchy)

Low calorie non-alcoholic drinks in a can are a great way to enjoy the sunshine if you're watching your calorie intake. Each of the drinks on our list is just as delicious as a boozy alternative but has under 150 calories per serving.

There are plenty of delicious zero-alcohol or low-alcohol by volume (ABV) drinks out there to enjoy but if you're watching what you're drinking for weight loss or maintenance purposes, it can be difficult to choose the right one. Many booze-free options come laden with sugar and additives to try and recreate the taste of the alcohol. But it doesn't need to be that way, with seltzers, spritzers, and mocktails from brands like Brewdog and Remedy Drinks coming in at just a tiny fraction of your daily calorie count. 

After going into a calorie deficit to lose weight last year, I opted for low calorie alcoholic drinks in a can at almost all social occasions (with it being lockdown and all, these were mainly outside). But these were my favorites when it came to picnics, barbeques, and booze-free events.

Low calorie non-alcoholic drinks in a can

Under 100 calories

Under 50 calories

Does non-alcoholic beer have alcohol in it?

Occasionally, yes. Beers that are labeled as 'alcohol-free' are legally allowed to contain up to 0.05% alcohol in the UK, while low-alcohol beers like Lucky Saint are typically de-alcoholized so they contain no more than 0.5% alcohol. 

According to a review in the Food Engineering Journal, manufacturers have two ways of reducing the alcohol content in beer. They can either remove the ethanol from the finished product, or they can make sure that alcohol doesn't form during the brewing process. 

While it's very easy to create alcohol-free cocktails, otherwise known as 'mocktails', creating truly alcohol-free beer is difficult because ethanol (the scientific name for alcohol) forms as a natural part of the brewing process. So these two processes to reduce the alcohol content in beer can vary in their success. 

Grace Walsh
Grace Walsh

A digital health journalist with over five years experience writing and editing for UK publications, Grace has covered the world of health and wellbeing extensively for Cosmopolitan, The i Paper and more.


She started her career writing about the complexities of sex and relationships, before combining personal hobbies with professional and writing about fitness. Everything from the best protein powder to sleep technology, the latest health trend to nutrition essentials, Grace has a huge spectrum of interests in the wellness sphere. Having reported on the coronavirus pandemic since the very first swab, she now also counts public health among them.