For the first time, get an underground peek inside Italy's Colosseum

Add this stop to your itinerary

A view of the Colosseum and the hypogea during the press conference for Tod's second phase of the restoration of the Flavian Amphitheater and the opening of the hypogea on June 25, 2021 in Rome, Italy.
(Image credit: Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

Rome is just one of the many cities filled with rich history and stunning monuments to explore. If you're planning a trip to the city anytime soon, now, visitors can get a deeper look into the famous Colosseum.

For travelers looking to take a break from the van life this summer, or anyone whose thought about renovating a home in an Italian village, make sure you add the Colosseum to your travel itinerary. Now, after completing a two-year restoration project, visitors can now explore the underground levels for the first-time ever.


More from woman& home:
• The UK's best nudist beaches for families and couples
• This pretty Italian village is selling houses for one euro each—don't miss out
• Wild camping in Scotland—everything you need to know


A view of the Colosseum and the hypogea during the press conference for Tod's second phase of the restoration of the Flavian Amphitheater and the opening of the hypogea on June 25, 2021 in Rome, Italy.

(Image credit: Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

Experience walking along the subterranean level of this wonder of the world, which has been restored to include wooden pathways for easier access. In its original form, this monument housed wild animals and gladiators in preparation for violent fights. Now, the only thing tourists will be expected to fight are lines to get in.

In the past, the Colosseum was also illuminated by candles. Since then, the main level was removed, allowing natural light to spill through. The restoration project was led by Italy's Ministry of Culture and funded by Diego Della Valle, the founder, and CEO of the Italian fashion brand Tod's.

During the unveiling ceremony, the director of the Colosseum Archaeological Park, Alfonsina Russo, spoke on how she hopes the restoration will provide visitors with a deeper understanding of how the Colosseum originally functioned.

"This restoration is absolutely important for the archaeological research because it enables us to reconstruct its history," she told CNN. "This was the backstage of the shows that went on in the area."

A group of reporters and guests enter the Hypogea area of the Colosseum ahead of a press conference to present the end of second stage of the monument's restorations, in Rome, Italy, on June 25, 2021.

(Image credit: Riccardo De Luca/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

This isn't the end of restoration plans though. To further immerse guests in history, plans have already begun to build a lightweight and retractable stage which will cover the subterranean levels. This will help enable visitors to view the monument like gladiators once did, while also being available as a hosting place for cultural events.

Rylee Johnston
Rylee Johnston

Rylee is a digital news writer for woman&home and My Imperfect Life. She covers everything from beauty and fashion trends to celebrity and entertainment news.