Is your salt spray ruining your hair?

Your favourite hair texturising product might not be helping as much as you think...

For years now we’ve been reading that the best way to achieve tousled, effortless looking hair is by dousing it in salt spray in order to get those summer beachy waves. Quick spritz and a scrunch and you’re ready to go, right? The dream.

But news just in – people are now saying that salt spray is actually damaging our hair and that maybe we shouldn’t be using quite as much of the stuff. Oh dear.

As much as we love salt sprays for giving our hair texture and movement, over time the salt can have a drying effect on hair – which is why it minimises that fluffy, just washed texture – good for beachy waves, but in the long term: bad for our tresses.

salt spray

If you think about it, it’s basically the same principle as wearing matte lipstick all the time. The dry texture of the lipsticks is going to dry your lips out – and it’s the same with sea salt sprays and your hair.

But don’t despair, because we’re not saying it’s time to throw out your favourite sea salt spray just yet. It’s just a case of everything in moderation…

To protect your hair against the drying effects of salt spray, use a hair oil, such as Argan oil, beforehand.

Or, if you really can’t put down the bottle, there’s a new era of sugar sprays that practically do the same for your hair – without the drying effects.

Whereas salt sprays dry out your strands, sugar sprays leave a sheen on your hair – adding the extra grip and texture – but with added hair hydration benefits.

salt spray

Spray in freshly washed hair for body and movement, without the drying effects of salt.

Our favourites? Check out Sachajuan Ocean Mist, £18, Ouai Wave Spray, £22 and Wella EIMI Sugar Lift Spray, £7 which all contain sugars which are less drying on the hair