Why Prince William and Kate Middleton's Caribbean trip could change the future of the British monarchy forever

Prince William and Kate Middleton will visit Jamaica, Belize and the Bahamas next month

Why William and Kate's Caribbean trip could change monarchy
(Image credit: Getty)

Prince William and Kate Middleton will travel to the Caribbean next month, for a trip that could permanently shape the future of the British monarchy. 

  • Prince William and Kate Middleton will travel to the Caribbean next month, on their first overseas royal tour in two years. 
  • The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expected to 'strengthen' the British monarchy's reputation during their visits to Jamaica, Belize, and the Bahamas—in the hope of preventing the Commonwealth nations from cutting ties with the Crown. 
  • In other royal news, Duchess Camilla tests positive for COVID-19.

Prince William and Kate Middleton will jet off to the sunny Caribbean in March—but no, they won't be sunbathing on any beaches when they land. 

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are traveling to the Bahamas, Jamaica, and Belize to 'strengthen' the Commonwealth nations' support for the British monarchy ahead of the Queen's Platinum Jubilee celebrations this summer. 

The 12-day tour—which is expected to have a focus on ecological issues—is due to take place just a few months after Prince Charles attended Barbados' ceremony to become a republic after almost 400 years of British rule. 

It's understood that the Queen has tasked William and Kate with the hefty job of preventing further Commonwealth realms from following suit, by winning over the public with exciting events and their undeniable charm. 

Prince William and Kate Middleton

Prince William and Kate Middleton on their 2014 tour in Australia 

(Image credit: Getty)

“A visit by William and Catherine can only bring out the crowds and strengthen the case for keeping the monarchy, at least in the immediate future," said Joe Little, the managing editor of Majesty magazine. 

Preparations for the Cambridges' tour are already underway, with royal representatives reportedly visiting Belize's Ambergris Caye to organize an 'advanced party' for the famous couple. It's understood that they will spend four days in the Central American country, which has been a Commonwealth member since 1981. 

In the Bahamas, William and Kate are expected to stop by Coral Vita, a social enterprise focused on reef restoration that also happened to win one of the Duke's five £1million Earthshot prizes last October. 

Kate and Will depart plane

Prince William and Kate Middleton arrive in Cyprus in 2018

(Image credit: Getty)

As for the Cambridge kids, it looks like they'll be staying at Kensington Palace while their parents are away on business. Neither Prince George, 8, nor Princess Charlotte, 6, have accompanied the couple on an engagement abroad since their visit to Germany in 2017, while Prince Louis, 3, is still waiting to experience his first overseas trip.

Cambridge kids

Prince William and Kate Middleton with Prince George and Princess Charlotte in Germany, 2017 

(Image credit: Getty)

The last senior royal to tour the Caribbean was Prince Harry, nearly a decade ago. The Duke of Sussex traveled to Belize, Bahamas, and Jamaica in March 2012 to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee, spending four days in total overseas. The sun-soaked trip saw the royal heir participate in multiple events, including a meeting with the then-Jamaican prime minister Portia Simpson Miller, and a race against renowned Jamaican sprinter, Usain Bolt. 

Emma is a Lifestyle News Writer for woman&home. Hailing from the lovely city of Dublin, she mainly covers the Royal Family and the entertainment world, as well as the occasional health and wellness feature. Always up for a good conversation, she has a passion for interviewing everyone from A-list celebrities to the local GP - or just about anyone who will chat to her, really.

 

Emma holds an MA in International Journalism from City, University of London and a BA in English Literature from Trinity College Dublin.