Queen's 1953 Coronation dress to go on display at Windsor for Jubilee celebrations

The dress was made by British couturier Sir Norman Hartnell

Queen's 'non-negotiable' passion revealed, seen here visiting The Chelsea Flower Show
(Image credit: Photo by Paul Grover - Pool / Getty Images)

The dress that the Queen wore during her coronation in 1953 will be celebrated by going on display at Windsor Castle this summer.


The Queen, who will Platinum Jubilee 2022, is known for her immaculate dress sense, so of course, the dress she decided on for her coronation in the 50s was no exception.

The short-sleeved dress was richly embroidered in a lattice-work effect with an iconographic scheme of national and Commonwealth floral emblems in gold and silver thread and pastel-colored silks, encrusted with seed pearls, sequins, and crystals. 

The dress also has the emblems of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales sewed onto it. While Hartnell added an extra four-leaf shamrock on the left side of the skirt for good luck, so her hand could rest upon it during the ceremony. 

The Robe, which the Queen also wore with her dress will also go on display. The long silk velvet robe, made by Ede and Ravenscroft, is purple and also has gold embroidery designs on it.

The Queen, who has reigned for nearly 70 years, wore the dress and the robe at Westminster Abbey on 2 June 1953 for her coronation and will be part of a special Platinum Jubilee display, from July 7 to September 26.

It's not the only piece of fashion that will go on display, as the Queen's most iconic fashion looks are being honoured in a very special way - going on display at Madame Tussauds the display will feature seven gowns worn by the monarch's 24 wax figures over the course of her 70 years on the throne.

The collection, which opens from May 27 for two weeks, will include a replica of the Queen's iconic coronation gown, worn when she was officially crowned in 1952.

The Queen's fashion looks will also include a recreation of her Imperial State Crown, displayed with her wax figures from 1956 until the early 1970. 

Sarah is a freelance journalist - writing about the royals and celebrities for Woman & Home, fitness and beauty for the Evening Standard and how the world of work has changed due to the pandemic for the BBC. 

 

She also covers a variety of other subjects and loves interviewing leaders and innovators in the beauty, travel and wellness worlds for numerous UK and overseas publications. 

 

As a journalist, she has written thousands of profile pieces - interviewing CEOs, real-life case studies and celebrities - interviewing everyone from Emma Bunton to the founder of Headspace.