This is why you might not be able to take your MacBook in your hand luggage anymore

MacBooks are great for long journeys. Whether you’re getting some remote working done, or you’re relaxing with your favourite films, they really help to pass the time.

But EasyJet have released a new legislation which has banned turning on Apple MacBook Pros which were bought between September 2015 and February 2017 on flights.

This is to avoid potentially faulty batteries causing issues during your flight.

A statement on EasyJet’s website reads: “In light of the recent EASA guidance customers are advised that they are not allowed to switch on or charge older generation 15-inch MacBook Pro units supplied by Apple Inc, between September 2015 and February 2017 during their flight.

“If such a device is taken on board, the passenger is required to keep it switched off and not use or charge the device”, the statement added.

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EasyJet

Credit: Getty Images

“Passengers should also be reminded to inform cabin crew immediately when a device is damaged, hot, produces smoke, is lost or falls into the seat structure.”

The EASA guidelines went on to state that it was only selected product serial numbers that were affected by the fault, and that “Apple has offered to replace the batteries for eligible devices free of charge”.

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Speaking to The Express, EasyJet went on to clarify these new rules: “In light of the recent EASA guidance concerning MacBook Pros, customers are not allowed to switch on or charge older generation 15-inch MacBook Pro units supplied by Apple Inc between September 2015 and February 2017 in flight.

“This guidance is highlighted on our website and the cabin crew will make PAs onboard to advise customers.”

So far it seems it’s only EasyJet that has issued this MacBook Pro warning to passengers, but it’s worth checking your own laptop and your tour operator’s guidelines before boarding. Better safe than sorry, especially if you desperately want to use your MacBook on board.