Dark Chocolate and Almond Torte Recipe

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Dark Chocolate and almond Torte-cake-desert-cooking-woman and home
Serves16+
Cooking Time1 hours 15 mins plus chilling
Total Time1 hours 15 mins plus chilling
Nutrition Per PortionRDA
Calories494 Kcal25%
Fat35 g50%
Saturated Fat18 g90%

For an alternative Easter cake recipe, why not try this delicious chocolate torte recipe for a different dessert idea this Easter?

This recipe serves up to 16 people and is really tasty when served up with a dollop of crème fraîche, ice cream or frozen yogurt.

HOW TO MAKE DARK CHOCOLATE AND ALMOND TORTE

Ingredients

  • 200g (7oz) butter, softened
  • 400g (14oz) dark chocolate, melted
  • 6 free-range eggs, separated
  • 225g (8oz) caster sugar
  • ½tsp vanilla extract
  • 1tsp almond extract
  • 150g (5oz) ground almonds
  • 150g (5oz) fresh raspberries

for the ganache topping

  • 200ml (7fl oz) double cream
  • 200g (7oz) dark chocolate, finely chopped

you will need

  • 23cm (9in) springform tin, greased and lined with baking parchment

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 180C, 160C fan, 350F, gas 4. To make the cake, melt the butter and chocolate in a bowl set over simmering water. Whisk the egg yolks and sugar with an electric mixer until light and pale, then stir in the vanilla and almond extracts. In a separate bowl and using the electric mixer, beat the egg whites until they become stiff.
  2. Add the butter and chocolate mix, and the almonds to the egg yolks and sugar; mix gently. Fold in the egg whites – try to keep as much air in as possible. Pour into the tin and bake for 45 minutes. Once cooled, chill in the fridge for at least an hour.
  3. To make the ganache, place the cream in a medium pan and bring to the boil. Take off the heat and add the chocolate. Allow the chocolate to melt, then whisk to mix into a thick ganache. Spread over the cake with a palette knife and top with fresh raspberries.
Top Tip for making Dark Chocolate and Almond Torte

Choose the best dark chocolate - the percentage of cocoa won't denote the quality of the chocolate - this will depend on where and how the beans were sourced, and from which producer. Price is a good indicator - even when baking, you will taste the difference, though not as much as when you're buying chocolate for eating. Lindt or Menier 70%, or Dr Oetker 72% are good cooking chocolates. Chocolate also boosts endorphins, the feel-good hormone, and contains antioxidants.