What will Her Majesty's ER crest change to now Charles is King? Everything we know as the reign of King Charles III begins

What will Her Majesty's ER crest change to now that King Charles III is on the throne? The royal cypher is about to change, but how?

Britain's King Charles III attends the Presentation of Addresses by both Houses of Parliament in Westminster Hall, inside the Palace of Westminster, central London on September 12, 2022 in London, England. The Lord Speaker and the Speaker of the House of Commons presented an Address to His Majesty on behalf of their respective House in Westminster Hall following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The King replied to the Addresses. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III.
(Image credit: Henry Nicholls - WPA Pool/Getty Images))

From postboxes to police helmets; and passports to official documents - the royal crest, known as the royal cypher is seen all over Britain. So what will Her Majesty's ER crest change to now Charles is King? 


King Charles III

(Image credit: Getty)

After Buckingham Palace announced that Queen Elizabeth II had died at Balmoral Castle, aged 96, it was clear that a lot of things were going to change. The first and most obvious adjustment to the UK's monarchy is that it's got a new ruler - King Charles III. King Charles III was officially proclaimed King with the signing of a declaration in a historic royal first, but a new monarch means a lot more than who's sitting on the throne. 

It turns out that something seen all over the UK, in countless iterations, is about to change - the royal cypher. So what will Her Majesty's crest change to now Charles is King?

What does ER stand for?

King Charles III signs an oath to uphold the security of the Church in Scotland during his proclamation as King during the accession council on September 10, 2022 in London, United Kingdom. His Majesty The King is proclaimed at the Accession Council in the State Apartments of St James's Palace, London. The Accession Council, attended by Privy Councillors, is divided into two parts. In part I, the Privy Council, without The King present, proclaims the Sovereign and part II where The King holds the first meeting of His Majesty's Privy Council. The Accession Council is followed by the first public reading of the Principal Proclamation read from the balcony overlooking Friary Court at St James's Palace. The Proclamation is read by the Garter King of Arms, accompanied by the Earl Marshal, other Officers of Arms and the Serjeants-at-Arms.

(Image credit: Victoria Jones - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

ER, or sometimes EIIR, stands for Elizabeth Regina - the late Queen Elizabeth II's first name followed by the Latin word for Queen. The extra letters in EIIR relate to her being Elizabeth II. 

King Charles will be known as CR or CIIIR, which stands for Charles Rex - i.e. the Latin word for King - and the extra digits in the middle represent that he's the third Charles on the British throne.

His new title became official when the monarch addressed the nation before signing an oath he declared in front of the Privy Council. Members of the Privy Council, including the Prince of Wales and Camilla and Queen Consort, also signed the declaration as witnesses in a historic moment. 

King Charles III leaves Westminster Hall after the Presentation of Addresses by both Houses of Parliament in Westminster Hall at the Houses of Parliament on September 12, 2022 in London, England. The Lord Speaker and the Speaker of the House of Commons presented an Address to His Majesty on behalf of their respective House in Westminster Hall following the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The King replied to the Addresses. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland on September 8, 2022, and is succeeded by her eldest son, King Charles III.

(Image credit: Markus Schreiber - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

The moment was historic in more ways than one as it was the first time the ceremony has been televised. It was also historic in that the King was seen wearing his royal insignia for the first time - heralding in the Carolean age, as the Elizabethan age comes to a close.

Aoife Hanna
Junior News Editor

Aoife is Junior News Editor at woman&home.

She's an Irish journalist and writer with a background in creative writing, comedy, and TV production.

Formerly Aoife was a contributing writer at Bustle and her words can be found in the Metro, Huffpost, Delicious, Imperica, EVOKE and her poetry features in the Queer Life, Queer Love anthology.

Outside of work you might bump into her at a garden center, charity shop, hot yoga studio, lifting heavy weights, or (most likely) supping/eating some sort of delicious drink/meal.