How to make an envelope cushion cover

Learning how to make an envelope cushion cover is a great project for a beginner sewer

Pink envelope cushion on a whicker chair
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Learn how to make an envelope cushion cover—a great beginner project to have a go at if you’re new to sewing and a quick and easy solution to brighten up your home. 

You'll mind this easier with a sewing machine, so we've rounded up the best sewing machines for every budget.

How to make an envelope cushion cover

You can watch our video guide that explains how to make an envelope cushion cover, but we've also broken down the instructions in the article too.

What you'll need

  • Cushion pad measuring 45 x 45cm
  • Piece of fabric measuring 48 x 106cm
  • Matching thread
  • Contrasting thread
  • Needle
  • Tape measure
  • Set square
  • Ruler
  • Dressmaker’s chalk
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Iron

How to make an envelope cushion cover in 8 steps

Step 1

Start by measuring the cushion pad itself. For the width of the cushion add 3cm for a seam allowance, so 48cm for a 45cm cushion. For the length, double this width and add 10cm to allow for the envelope overlap, so 106cm.

Step 2

Transfer these measurements to your fabric using a ruler, dressmaker’s chalk and a setsquare to get an absolute right angle, and cut out the front cushion panel.

Step 3

If you’re using a patterned fabric and want a motif to sit in the centre of the cushion face, first transfer the measurements to a piece of tracing paper before laying over the fabric so you can see the pattern underneath. Then pin the paper to the fabric and cut out.

Cushion

(Image credit: Future)

Step 4

At the two short ends of your fabric create a double hem as these will be the edges of your envelope opening. Fold the fabric over by 1.5cm and press, and then fold the fabric over the previous fold by another 1.5cm, press, pin and tack in place.

Cushion

(Image credit: Future)

Step 5

Using a sewing machine set to straight stitch to sew the hems on the right side of the fabric.

Step 6

With right sides facing, pin and tack the cushion panel together, making sure to overlap the double hemmed edges by 10cm to create the envelope opening. Pin along the unsewn edges and tack together.

Cushion

(Image credit: Future)

Step 7

Using the same settings as before on your sewing machine, straight stitch the two tacked sides following the tacking stitches as a guide.

Step 8

Clip the corners and turn the cushion cover right side out, pushing a closed pair of scissors into the corners to get a crisp point. Give the cover a final press before inserting the cushion pad.

Cushion

(Image credit: Future)

Next time follow our guide for how to make piping for a cushion to add some extra detail to your cushion cover.

And, if you're keen to craft more lovely, unique pieces, you can also find our guide to how to make a lavender pillow here, and our step-by-step guide to more easy sewing projects here.

Esme Clemo

Esme Clemo is the home and craft editor at woman&home. With over seven year’s experience working in the publishing industry, she’s written for Womanandhome.com, GoodtoKnow, woman&home, Woman’s Weekly, Woman, Woman’s Own, Chat, Now, Pick Me Up, The Craft Network and Wealden Times magazines and websites, as well as a stint as a columnist for Wedding Ideas. 


There’s nothing she doesn’t know about DIY, weddings and interiors. Everything in her home and wardrobe has a DIY twist and she knows all the tools needed for getting the job done. Be it her trusty sewing machine to update clothing and cushions or her battered collection of power tools to strip her staircase or build raised beds in her garden. She sure has a hands-on approach when it comes to testing out products for our reviews. 


Having just completed an interior design course with the University of Arts London, she’s now embarking on project managing and designing her own kitchen renovation, ready to share all her tips, tricks and best home buys with you. You can follow her reno journey on Instagram @esmeclemo