The significance and sweet meaning behind the sustainable wreath of flowers on Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin at the State Funeral

Queen Elizabeth II's funeral wreath includes flowers with deep significance as well as a sweet nod to Prince Philip

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II with the Imperial State Crown resting on top is carried into Westminster Abbey
(Image credit: Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Queen Elizabeth II is being laid to rest alongside her late husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh after a State Funeral filled with details of great personal and historical significance. 

  • Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II’s State Funeral is taking place on September 19. 
  • Upon her coffin is a wreath of beautiful red and pink flowers, cut from royal residences, as requested by King Charles. 
  • The choice of plants and flowers is seen as incredibly meaningful, with special traditions associated with each one.  

On September 19, members of the Royal Family were joined by politicians, European royalty and leaders from across the world as they paid their respects to Britain’s longest-reigning monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, at her State Funeral service. Upon the Queen’s coffin was the Imperial State Crown, Sovereign’s Orb and Sceptre and a beautiful wreath of flowers.  

As revealed by the Royal Family on the day of Her Majesty’s funeral, the flowers were by personal request of King Charles. The flowers on the Queen’s coffin contained rosemary, English oak, and myrtle, as well as flowers in pink, burgundy, and gold shades, with touches of white. 

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II with the Imperial State Crown resting on top is carried by the Bearer Party as it departs Westminster Abbey

(Image credit: Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

The myrtle in particular is hugely meaningful as it was cut from a plant grown from the myrtle that was included in Queen Elizabeth’s wedding bouquet when she married Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh in November 1947. He was previously described by Her Majesty as her “strength and stay” so the decision to include myrtle with such a special origin is the sweetest nod to their love. 

White myrtle has been the flower of choice for royal brides since the 1850s, with English Heritage (opens in new tab) having explained it was first used at the wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s eldest daughter, Princess Victoria. Since then, flowers grown from the same plant have been featured in the bouquets of several generations of brides.

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II with the Imperial State Crown resting on top is carried by the Bearer Party into Westminster Abbey

(Image credit: Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

The significance of the Queen’s funeral wreath continued with the choice of English oak, which is thought to symbolize the strength of love, and rosemary, which is a traditional symbol of remembrance. Also included in the symbolic wreath are scented pelargoniums, garden roses, autumnal hydrangea, sedum, dahlias, and scabious. 

All blooms and foliage have been cut from the gardens of Royal Residences. According to The Independent (opens in new tab), these residences were Clarence House, the London residence of the King when he was Prince of Wales, as well as Buckingham Palace, the Queen’s official London residence, and Highgrove House in Gloucestershire. 

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II with the Imperial State Crown resting on top is carried by the Bearer Party into Westminster Abbey

(Image credit: Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Highgrove is King Charles’ countryside home and its gardens hold a special place in his heart having spent many years working on them with a focus on sustainability, from using natural fertilizers to having solar panels. The choice to include flowers from Highgrove, alongside those from his former home and the Queen’s official residence is a touching tribute. 

The pretty wreath, in a nest of English moss and oak branches, is also understood to have been made completely sustainably, on the request of King Charles III. 

On top of the wreath sits a white card that simply reads, “In loving and devoted memory. Charles R”.  

Emma is a Senior Lifestyle Writer with six years of experience working in digital publishing. Her specialist areas including literature, the British Royal Family and knowing all there is to know about the latest TV shows on the BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and every streaming service out there. When she’s not writing about the next unmissable show to add to your to-watch list or delving into royal protocol, you can find Emma cooking and watching yet more crime dramas.