Princess Eugenie is the first member of the royal family to do THIS

princess eugenie podcast

Princess Eugenie has fast earned a reputation for breaking new ground when it comes to how the royals’ promote themselves and the causes they support online.

In March 2018 she became one of the few royals to hold an individual Instagram account – possibly following on from the example set by her mother Sarah Ferguson – and now the 10th in line to the throne is set to become the first royal to launch a podcast.

The exciting news was revealed on the official Instagram page of The Anti-Slavery collective – described as an ‘independent collective whose mission is to bring change-makers together to raise awareness for modern slavery as a global epidemic’ – of which she is co-founder.

In the short video teaser post – which has clocked up more than 1,000 likes – the Princess and fellow co-founder Julia de Boinville discuss why they created The Anti-Slavery Collective, and revealed more on the forthcoming podcast.

“We’re developing a podcast with Freedom United, and we will have a speaker series called Tech Tackles Trafficking,” she says in the video.

“Now is the time to talk about this, this is on everyone’s mind. And if it isn’t, we will make it on their mind.”

Eugenie also went on to highlight some of what the podcast hopes to achieve by saying, “We do this for the person who can’t scream and shout like we can … for the women, girls, men, children all over the world.”

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While details of when the podcast will debut and how many episodes will be included have yet to be confirmed, that didn’t stop fans of the royal from getting excited about it.

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One wrote: ‘Great film girls. Powerful. You are doing so much to change people’s lives. Looking forward to the podcast.’

A second added: ‘Great job. A lot of people think slavery is a thing of the past. Modern slavery is often hidden, I think people would be appalled and shocked to discover how prevalent it is in the UK and not just in London and other major cities. Your campaign to highlight the problems vulnerable people face can only do good.’