The Woman in the Window is finally coming to Netflix after an excruciatingly long delay

The Woman in the Window release was delayed numerous times due to ongoing obstacles

The Woman in the Window
The Woman in the Window
(Image credit: Melinda Sue Gordon/Netflix)

The Woman in the Window has been struck by delays ever since it was announced in 2019—but it looks like it's finally ready to hit screens. 

From its final release date to its plot details, we have all the answers to your burning questions about this highly anticipated film. 

Where can I watch The Woman in the Window 2021? 

The psychological thriller, which is based on the controversial AJ Finn novel of the same name, will premiere on Netflix on May 14, after a two-year-long slew of logistical disruptions. And judging by its explosive trailer, the film is definitely a candidate for our best book-to-movie adaptations list. 

What is The Woman in the Window about? 

Starring Amy Adams and Julianne Moore, The Woman in the Window tells the story of a psychologist who suffers from agoraphobia, an anxiety disorder that causes people to fear certain environments. 


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Unable to leave her New York condo, Anna (Adams) can only contact the outside world through her window and when guests come to visit. She mentally unravels after nobody will believe her claims that she witnessed her friend, Jane, (Moore) being attacked in the adjacent apartment. 

The violent scene sets the foundation for a gripping drama, pulling Anna into a state of disorientation as she begins to wonder whether the murder occurred in reality— or in a hallucination.  

Melinda Sue Gordon

The Woman in the Window stars Amy Adams and Julianne Moore 

(Image credit: Melinda Sue Gordon/Netflix)

Why was The Woman in the Window release date delayed? 

With its heavyweight cast and fascinating plotline, cinema buffs have been eagerly anticipating The Woman in the Window for two years now. 

The film initially experienced delays in early 2019, after wrapping up production in October 2018. The movie was originally shot under 21st Century Fox but was forced to undergo reshoots after the media corporation was acquired by Disney. 

Apparently, audiences were 'confused' at test screenings by the narrative. The script was altered to make the film easier to understand, but the finished product was still criticized for being too complex. The movie was therefore pushed back again, with a renewed release date of May 15, 2020. 

These plans were scrapped however when the Covid-19 pandemic forced movie theatres to close worldwide. The Woman in the Window was finally acquired by Netflix, who will be screening the long-awaited film on May 14. 

Who is AJ Finn, the author of The Woman in the Window? 

While there's no way to know for sure, the film's tumultuous journey to completion may have also been shaped by its associations with AJ Finn. 

The author of The Woman in the Window novel earned a not-so-stellar reputation after accusations of deceit were made against him in The New York Times. The publication alleged that Finn, whose real name is Dan Mallory, fabricated several facts about his life, including his academic credentials. 

The writer said that he had earned a doctorate degree from Oxford University, a claim that was later found to be false. Mallory also made up tragic stories about his family, lying that his brother had committed suicide and that his mother died of cancer. He later attributed this behavior to a diagnosis of Bipolar II disorder.

Is The Woman in the Window a good book? 

The Woman in the Window received mostly positive reviews, with many critics praising Finn for his inventive writing style and complex character development. The novel is known for its abundance of cliffhangers and plot twists, which may well explain why film producers found it challenging to bring the story to the big screen. 

Fast-paced yet suspenseful, it'll likely have you on the edge of your seat as you race through its chapters to find out what happens next. We suggest you switch off your phone, shut the curtains, and settle in for the evening—trust us, you won't want any distractions for this.