Scientists predict the world’s oceans could be restored by 2050

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    Scientists have predicted that the world’s oceans could be restored within the next 30 years.

    Experts have said that the waters destroyed by the impacts of pollution, over fishing and habitat disruption may be recovered by the year 2050 thanks to conservation work.

    It is thought that marine life could be restored and climate change could be helped to be reversed.

    The review in the journal Nature says the Earth’s climate crisis needs to be dealt with, something that can be done by conserving coastal habitats and oceans, which help to soak up carbon dioxide emissions.

    Scientists have recommended actions required to restore oceans in the next three decades include species, harvesting wisely and restoring habitats such as salt marshes, mangroves, seagrasses, coral reefs, kelp, oyster reefs, fisheries and megafauna.

    Credit: Getty

    Professor Carlos Duarte, of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia, said, “We have a narrow window of opportunity to deliver a healthy ocean to our grandchildren, and we have the knowledge and tools to do so.

    “Our study documents the recovery of marine populations, habitats and ecosystems following past conservation interventions. It provides specific, evidence-based recommendations to scale proven solutions globally.

    “We know what we ought to do to rebuild marine life, and we have evidence that this goal can be achieved within three decades. Indeed, this requires that we accelerate our efforts, and spread them to areas where efforts are currently modest.”

    We now have the skills and expertise to be able to restore vital marine habitats such as oyster reefs, mangrove swamps and salt marshes – which keep our seas clean, our coasts protected and provide food to support entire ecosystems,” adds co-author Professor Callum Roberts from the University of York.

    “Science gives us reason to be optimistic about the future of our oceans, but we are not currently doing enough in the UK or globally.”

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