Plum Jam Recipe

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This easy plum jam recipe lets you make the most of your garden plums when they're in season.

A picture of plums in a bowl used to make a homemade plum jam recipe
(Image credit: Getty)
  • Dairy-free
  • Gluten-free
Makes4–6
SkillEasy
Preparation Time5 mins
Cooking Time30 mins
Total Time35 mins

This plum jam recipe makes a really lovely edible gift. Especially if you use pretty jars that you can personalise with hand-written labels and some twine for a rustic feel. 

Plums come into season in the UK in August and will stay in season until October. So, you have plenty of time to make homemade plum jam while the key ingredient is at its best.

Many people are put off by making their own jam, but it really couldn't be easier. You only need two ingredients for this plum jam recipe: sugar and plums, and the sterilisation process is really simple too. You can have your jam in the jars and ready to go in just over 30 minutes - easy! We've also created a great guide on common jam mistakes and how to fix them.

How to make plum jam at home

Ingredients

  • 1.25kg (2lb 12oz) plums, halved and stoned
  • 900g (2lb) preserving or granulated sugar

You will need: A preserving pan, sugar thermometer, sterilized jars and lids

Method

  1. Put the prepared plums in the pan with 300ml water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer the fruit for 15 to 20 minutes or until the plums are very soft.
  2. Add the sugar and stir until dissolved. 
  3. Increase the heat to a boil and boil for 5-10 minutes until the jam has reached setting point. 
  4. Pot into hot, sterilized jars and seal.

Top tip for making plum jam

Ground ginger or cinnamon is a really nice addition to plum jam, just add a couple of teaspoons (or more to your liking) when you add the sugar.

How to store your plum jam

As long as you ensure the jar is sealed well and has been sterilised properly, it can keep for a few months without being opened. This is why it makes such a good gift, as you can have it ready well in advance. You could even make a big batch - and that's Christmas food gifts and birthday presents sorted for the rest of the year.

When you open the jar, it's best to keep the jam in the fridge and eat it within a month. If you start noticing any mould, make sure you get rid of it, as it can make you quite unwell if you eat it. You can add a little twist to this plum jam by adding a bit of cinnamon to it, for a little extra spice. It's perfect on toast for breakfast or with homemade scones with cream for a different take on afternoon tea! You can even have it with French toast for brunch if you fancy trying something new. 

After leaving university with a BSc in Food from the University of Birmingham, Samuel embarked on a career in teaching; he taught cookery to teenagers at secondary school level. At the weekends, he worked as a sous chef and assisted on food photography shoots during the holidays. 


After 8 years as a teacher, he decided to concentrate fully on food writing. Nearly 15 years after he began his professional food career, his work has featured in national and international publications including Waitrose Food, Australian Delicious, and the LAD Bible Group. Samuel was also a nutritional consultant for BBC’s Eat Well for Less. Throughout his career he has specialised in recipe writing and he still loves to teach people how to cook (although he’s not quite as patient as he used to be!).


After travelling Europe searching for the best coffee shops, he landed the perfect role working across woman&home, Woman’s Weekly, Country Homes & Interiors, Livingetc, Homes & Gardens and GoodtoKnow. Along with the Test Kitchen team, he produces recipes and looks after the content for these magazines and websites and others in the Future portfolio. 


Away from Future, Samuel is also Co-Vice Chair of the Guild of Food Writers and a Trustee of 91 Ways CIC. He can usually be found binge-watching TV shows, wandering a museum or escaping the city for greener and sunnier climates. He also dreams of buying a run-down Italian villa and turning it into a cookery school in the sun.