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Thread: Painting Pine Furniture (DIY Novice)

  1. #1
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    Painting Pine Furniture (DIY Novice)

    Ladies,

    I turn to the experts. I have a couple of bookcases in that rather unattractive baked bean shade of pine. Nothing wrong with them but they are not lookers. They live in a magnolia study so I thought I might paint them to give some colour to the room, other than baked bean. Any hints/tips? Assume I need to strip them first? Do I use normal sandpaper for this? And then what colour would work? Any advice gratefully received.

    Thanks,
    Anne

  2. #2
    Senior Member Hollyhock's Avatar
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    Hi Annebags,

    you will need to sand them so the paint can adhere to the surface. I have a friend who does this all the time, she sands the surface using a small electrical sander then paints using several coats of emulsion as she prefers it to other paints. You could sand them by hand but it will take much longer. My friend also never paints them white as it is so stark, she uses very pale colours such as duck egg so they look white from a distance but are much softer up close.

    If you want to be really fancy then after you have sanded and painted you can pick a pretty wallpaper and use to decorate the inside of the bookcase at the back before replacing the shelves, it can look amazing.

    Happy upcycling and don't forget to show us a pic of your handiwork after.

    HH

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    When you have painted you could also put on a clear matt varnish to protect the paintwork. Good sanding is the key. Try to get off as much of the orange as possible.

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    There's someone I follow on Twitter who runs a day course on painting furniture, but can't remember who... will have a trawl through and let you know... x

    Some suggestions on here, but not sure where they are:

    http://westegg-interiors.blogspot.co...-for-2013.html
    Last edited by Beezer; 04-06-2013 at 05:39 PM.

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    Thanks, all. Think I will have to biuy a sander - do not fancy doing it all by hand. Duck egg blue is nice idea.

    Think there is real gap in the market for DIY classes for the novice. I am sure they would be popular. I can't find anything locally.

  6. #6
    Senior Member woolie's Avatar
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    I have done a lot of painting of these sort of items. As has been said, rub down with a fairly course sandpaper, then use a finer one to finish off. Brush off the dust, or hoover it off. Run a rag with turps all over the surface of the wood. Let dry.

    Now, it depends on what paint finish you want to put on. Generally, I would recommend an undercoat which will adhere to the wood really well, and provide a good 'flat' surface to paint upon. Then Emulsion can be used, but generally is not hardwearing, and used for ceilings and walls, and is not scrubbable generally. It gives a dull surface anyway.

    After the undercoat is dry, which may take a day or so, Personally, I would use Plascon Velvaglow. this is a polyeurathene enamel paint with a very strong durability. I am not sure if it is sold int he U.K. but there is also a Dulux paint, which, unlike Plascons Velvaglow, is a water based paint, and tough and long lasting - it is called Pearl Glow. These are both gel paints, and easy to get a good finish. 2 coats will be enough, and will withstand bangs and chips. Velvaglow has lasted me around 15 years, which wouldn't be the case with an emulsion. Allow to really dry between coats, and if necessary, gently rub over with a fine sandpaper in between, as sometimes the grain can get raised. Good luck!
    woolie x

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    I haven't used it myself yet but someone (who does this sort of thing a lot) told me that 'Annie Sloan' paint is great for this type of project. Because its chalk based, preparation is minimal. I don't know whether that's true or not but you can google Annie Sloan for more info and decide for yourself!

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    I recently painted some bedroom furniture. I lightly rubbed them over with fine sandpaper and then used Bedek paint. We had a builder in and he recommended the paint which is an undercoat top coat all in one. I used it on the doors first and by the time I got to the bottom of the door the top was dry and was ready for another coat! It's water based so rollers and brushes just get washed. Happy painting.

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    Woolie you sound like a true professional! Have some pine furniture in the basement store - this has given me food for thought!

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    Senior Member woolie's Avatar
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    Gosh Margaret - I have been doing this sort of thing since I was 19, and I will be 65 this Saturday! Too long methinks! I have still got to paint my bedside cabinets chocolate, and my book case. I am going to stain the bookcase pine after sanding it down with the sander, and take it from pine to walnut to match the TV unit.
    I also have to paint OH's bedside cabinets to match the headboard! Those cabinets started out with a pine stain, went to white, then on to Fuscia pink, and then on to biscuit! So many re-incarnations! They take so long as well, as I have to take the glass out from the top, and there is a sort of raffia pattern with lots of holes in it. Each one takes around three hours to paint! Best to wear a mask if you have allergies like me..
    woolie x

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